Chilli con carne

Just a classic meal. Brings back memories of making large saucepans of it at parties and everyone tucking in, it has to be the simplest thing to cook for a crowd, and they always love a chilli. Serve it with or without rice with some sour cream or Greek yoghurt on the side.
  • Serves
    2
  • Prep
    10 mins
  • Cook
    30 mins
  • Difficulty
    Easy
Ingredients
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 red pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 clove of garlic, crushed
  • 1-2 red chillies deseeded and finely chopped
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 400g quality beef mince
  • 200ml of hot water
  • 200g can chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon of Marigold vegetable bouillon, or a stock cube
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree
  • 10 sun dried tomatoes
  • pinch of sugar, or 2 squares of dark chocolate
  • 200-300g of red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
Instructions
Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add the onions, garlic and chilli and gently fry until the onions are soft.

Add the red pepper, paprika and cumin. Stir well to combine and leave to cook for 5 mins, stirring occasionally.

Turn the heat up slightly and add the mince to the pan. Bash it a bit so it breaks up. Keep stirring until the mince is brown.

Blend the sun dried tomatoes, sugar, tomato purée and little hot water until smooth then add to the pan with the tinned tomatoes, vegetable bouillon or stock cube and a can of hot water.

Bring to a simmer then put the lid on and cook on a low heat for 20 mins. Stir occasionally so the chilli doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan.

Finally add the kidney beans and cook for a further 5-10 mins. Taste to check seasoning.
Nutrition info
Beef is an excellent source of Vitamin B12, which plays a role in DNA production and nervous system health as well as in the production of red blood cells. It also provides iron for good oxygen transport.

Kidney beans are a fantastic source of fibre as well as folate. Folate is essential for a healthy nervous system and production of red blood cells and is a key nutrient for pre-conception and the early months of pregnancy.

Spice up your energy with an eatnaturally plan!

This was the kind of plant that endears itself to a teenage boy. These weren’t vegetables, they were weapons!
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