How to roast potatoes

I don’t think I know anyone who doesn’t love roast roast spuds! How to roast potatoes is something everyone should be taught at school. But they’re not, so here we are with a foolproof method for golden crispy roast potatoes with fluffy insides.
  • Serves
    Up to you!
  • Prep
    20 mins
  • Cook
    30-40 mins
  • Difficulty
    Easy
Ingredients
  • as many floury-variety potatoes as you need to feed however many people you’re feeding. Floury varieties include King Edward and Maris Piper.
  • organic goose fat, or lard. Daylesford Organic goose fat is from free-range geese. If vegetarian use extra light olive oil with a bit of butter – don’t use regular or your spuds will taste, untraditionally, of olive oil.
  • sea salt
Instructions
Peel the potatoes and cut in half either lengthways or across the middle. My mum always cut lengthways – you get more of a surface for crisping. Be guided by the size of each potato, larger potatoes might need quartering.

Place the potatoes in a large pan of cold water and bring to the boil. Boil for 10-15 mins until slightly soft but still hard in the middle.

Meanwhile heat the oven to very high, I go for about 250-275deg but whichever oven you have it’s pretty safe to whack it up to high! Also heat enough goose fat, lard or vegetable oil and butter to form about a centimetre of liquid fat when heated. Heat it until it’s spitting, and use a heavy roasting tin without a dip around the edges.

Drain the potatoes in a colander then tip them back into the saucepan and give them a light shake to roughen their outsides so they get more crispy in the oven.

Tip the potatoes into the hot fat, careful not to get splashed, and coat them in fat. Add a sprinkle of sea salt then roast them for around 30-40 mins until golden and crispy.
Nutrition info
Potatoes are wrongly slated by nutrition fashionistas. They have plenty going for them, as well as being incredibly delicious!

Their biggest claim to fame is their vitamin B6, which is used throughout the body for cell formation, and that's a pretty big task. B6 is also a key player in nerve and brain function, as well as gene expression. Spuds are also pretty rich in vitamin C, which isn't only good for immunity but plays a strong part in forming and maintaining healthy connective tissue and skin.

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Mum, you make the best roast potatoes in the world.
Rory Pinnegar
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